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Celine Dion cancels North American tour over health issue

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Autoplay Celine Dion has canceled her North American tour amid health issues, she announced on social media.

"I was really hoping I’d be good to go by now, but I suppose I just have to be more patient and follow the regimen my doctors are prescribing," Dion said in a Twitter message posted Saturday, announcing the cancellation of the "Courage World Tour." Celine Dion performs onstage in Los Angeles, Nov. 22, 2015. (Getty Images) Dion initially completed 52 shows of the tour by March 2020 before the coronavirus spread across the country, and she intended to resume shows on March 9, 2022, in Denver , prior to this announcement. The tour also included stops in San Francisco, San Diego, Los Angeles , Pittsburgh, and other U.S. and Canadian cities.

"There’s a lot of organizing and preparation that goes into our shows, and so we have to make decisions today which will affect the plans two months down the road," Dion continued in the Saturday statement. "I’ll be so glad to get back to full health, as well as all of us getting past this pandemic, and I can’t wait to be back on stage again." Dion, who turns 54 this year, recently received treatment for "severe and persistent muscle spasms which are preventing her from performing, and her recovery is taking longer than she hoped," according to the statement. Celine Dion sings during the 70th Academy Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. (Getty Images) Dion is still scheduled to participate in the "European leg" of the tour, which is scheduled to begin May 25, in Birmingham, England. Those who purchased tickets for the now-canceled shows in the North American tour will be fully refunded, according to the statement.

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Ralph Emery, famed country music broadcaster, dead at 88

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Autoplay Ralph Emery, who became known as the dean of country music broadcasters over more than a half-century in both radio and television , died Saturday, his family said. He was 88.

Emery passed away peacefully of natural causes, surrounded by family, at Tristar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville , his son, Michael, told The Associated Press. He had been hospitalized for a week.

VINCE GILL, MEL TILLIS AND RALPH EMERY TO ENTER COUNTRY MUSIC HALL OF FAME

Beginning his career at small radio stations and then moving into television as well, Emery was probably best known for his work on the Nashville Network cable channel. From 1983 to 1993, he was host of the channel’s live talk-variety show "Nashville Now," earning the title "the Johnny Carson of cable television" for his interviewing style. From 2007 to 2015, Emery hosted a weekly program on RFD-TV, a satellite and cable TV channel.

He was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2007. Television and radio personality Ralph Emery speaks to reporters after it was announced that he will be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2007, in Nashville, Tennessee. (Associated Press) "Ralph Emery’s impact in expanding country music’s audience is incalculable," said Kyle Young, CEO of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, in a statement Saturday. "On radio and on television, he allowed fans to get to know the people behind the songs. Ralph was more a grand conversationalist than a calculated interviewer, and it was his conversations that revealed the humor and humanity of Tom T. Hall, Barbara Mandrell, Tex Ritter, Marty Robbins and many more. Above all, he believed in music and in the people who make it."

Born on March 10, 1933 in McEwen, Tennessee, Emery attended broadcasting school in Nashville and got his first radio job at WTPR in Paris, Tennessee . He later worked at radio stations in Louisiana and the Nashville area before signing on in 1957 at Nashville’s WSM, the station that carries the Grand Ole Opry, until 1972. Tammy Genovese, second left, Country Music Association Chief Operating Officer, poses for a photo with Vince Gill, left, Ralph Emery and Mel Tillis, right, Tuesday, Aug. 7, 2007, in Nashville, Tennessee, after it was announced that the three men will be inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. (Associated Press) His autobiography, "Memories," came out in 1991, followed by "More Memories" in 1993 and "The View From Nashville: On the Record with Country Music’s Greatest Stars" in 1998.Emery hosted "Pop Goes the Country," a syndicated TV show, from 1974 through 1980. From 1981 to 1983, he was host of "Nashville Alive," on cable station WTBS. Country music star Barbara Mandrell hugs country television personality Ralph Emery after Mandrell was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, Tennessee, Sunday, May 17, 2009. (Associated Press) On the talk-variety show "Nashville Now," Emery sat at a desk, […]

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Miami rapper Wavy Navy Pooh killed in ambush shooting

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Autoplay Miami rapper Wavy Navy Pooh was killed in an ambush shooting as he drove with two young children, local media reported.

The 28-year-old rapper, whose real name was Shandler Beaubien, was stopped at a light Friday evening when a car pulled alongside and someone inside opened fire, killing him, the Miami Herald and WPLG-TV reported. Two children , ages 5 and 1, and a woman were also in his car but they were not hurt.

Police have not released the victim’s name, but Quality Control, the rapper’s record label, confirmed it was him, WPLG reported. No arrests have been made. A Miami police car with lights ablaze responds to a call as they patrol the street on Aug. 11, 2010. (Getty Images) Beaubien is best known for his song "M.I.A.M.I. (Murder is a Major Issue). Its video shows him waving a handgun, a staged murder scene and footage of police officers at actual shooting scenes.

The Herald reports that Beaubien was wounded in the leg during a drive-by shooting while driving two years ago.

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Dallas Frazier, writer of Oak Ridge Boys hit ‘Elvira’ and others songs, dead at 82

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Autoplay Songwriter Dallas Frazier, a multi- Grammy winner who is enshrined in the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, died on Friday, according to a report. He was 82.

Frazier built a career on his notable songwriting ability, creating hits like Hollywood Argyles’ 1960 hit "Alley Oop", The Oak Ridge Boys‘ 1981 classic "Elvira," and the 1971’s Jack Greene-recorded "There Goes My Everything."

"Dallas Frazier is among the greatest country songwriters of all time," said Kyle Young, CEO of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, Billboard reported .

Frazier, who was born in Spiro, Oklahoma , also co-wrote numerous No. 1 hits with A.L. "Doodle" Owens, including 1969’s "All I Have to Offer You (Is Me)," which was Charley Pride‘s first No. 1 Billboard Hot Country Songs hit. Pride scored two other No. 1 country hits alongside Frazier and Owens, include "(I’m So) Afraid of Losing You Again," in 1969, "I Can’t Believe That You’ve Stopped Loving Me," in1970, and "Then Who Am I," in 1974. (Pride died in 2020 to COVID-19-related complications). Recording Artist Connie Smith, BMI’s Clay Bradley and Songwriter Dallas Frazier during Sugar Hill Records’ "Long Line of Heartaches" Reception With Connie Smith on Sept. 8, 2011, at the BMI offices in Nashville, Tennessee. "He could convey infectious fun with ‘Elvira,’ and then write something as stunningly sad and true as ‘Beneath Still Waters,’" Young added. "His songs helped Connie Smith to become a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame. He was a man of kindness, generosity, and faith, who overcame a hardscrabble upbringing to offer smiling gifts to all of us. He lived a beautiful life of a beautiful mind."

In 1976, Frazier was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame, and he continued producing top hits. Dallas Frazier performs at "Songs That Tell a Story," the final Marty Stuart Artist-in-Residence Show at Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum on September 25, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Getty Images) Frazier wrote "Beneath Still Waters" for Emmylou Harris in 1980, which became a No. 1 country hit. He also co-wrote Tanya Tucker‘s "What’s Your Mama’s Name?" which became her first No. 1 hit, Billboard reported.

Frazier’s applauded writing ability created a magical feel to listeners, he said in an interview in 2018 with journalist Tom Roland. Dallas Frazier, left, and Marty Stuart perform at "Songs That Tell a Story," the Third of Three Marty Stuart Artist-in-Residence Shows at Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum on Sept. 25, 2019 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Getty Images) "I’ve noticed this all my life in writing songs, there’s a thing called feel, and it’s magic when you get ahold of it," Frazier said. "It can make or break a record. You can have a great song and all, but if it doesn’t have that feel, it just doesn’t do anything. ‘Elvira’ had the feel. And The Oaks, what a tremendous cut. With Richard Sterban doing his thing on it and the […]

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‘SNL’ cold open shows Biden blaming COVID surge on ‘Spider-Man’ movie fans

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Autoplay " Saturday Night Live "’s President Biden (played by James Austin Johnson) had a solution to the recent surge in coronavirus cases during the show’s cold open this weekend: "Stop seeing ‘ Spider-Man !’"

"Spider-Man: No Way Home" topped the box office for four straight weeks after it premiered in mid-December.

"Think about it. When did Spider-Man come out?" Johnson’s Biden mused at a fake news conference. "Dec. 17. When did every single person get omicron? The week after Dec. 17. Stop seeing ‘Spider-Man!’"

The fake Biden then took questions from reporters – played by other "SNL" cast members. One of them asked if the president thought the pandemic would end if people stopped going to the movies.

"I didn’t say ‘Don’t go to the movies’ – I said ‘Stop seeing Spider-Man!’" Biden shouted. James Austin Johnson plays President Joe Biden on "Saturday Night Live," Oct. 2, 2021. (Getty Images) He said his data was based on: "Everyone in America has seen ‘Spider-Man’ like eight times. Everyone in America also has COVID."

He advised that Americans didn’t need to test to find out if they have the virus."Look at your hand. Is it holding a ticket that says you recently went to see ‘Spider-Man?’ If so, then you have COVID," he said.Johnson’s Biden later explained he hasn’t seen the movie because he couldn’t get tickets, suggesting his motive for asking movie patrons not to go may have been so he would have an easier time getting a seat. The fake president also expanded ‘Spider-Man’’s culpability to include this year’s record inflation and the stalling of the Democrats’ voting rights bill in Congress. Johnson compared moderate Democratic Sens. Joe Manchin and Kyrsten Sinema to villains who battle the superhero. People entering a movie theater in Antwerp, Belgium, Friday, Dec. 24, 2021. (Getty Images) "The only difference is if one of Spider-Man’s villains saw Kyrsten Sinema they’d be like, ‘Hey, honey, that outfit is a little much.’"Later, he revealed he had discovered we are all existing in a ‘Spider-Man’-style multiverse in which there are at least three Joe Bidens: "One of them is me, one of them is a Joe Biden that lost to Trump. That Biden hosts a show on CNBC called ‘T-Birds, Tacos and Trains.’ And then there’s a third Joe Biden who’s the greatest president in history. My approval ratings are sky-high, I’m actually supported by my own party and I understand the show ‘Euphoria.’"When a reporter balked at the idea everyone is living in a multiverse, Johnson countered: "Doesn’t that make more sense than whatever the hell our current world is?" President Joe Biden delivers remarks during an event in the State Dining Room of the White House, Monday, Oct. 4, 2021, in Washington. At the end of the sketch cast member Pete Davidson appeared as a shirtless, tattooed version of Biden from the "real universe." He warned the timeline the rest of us are living in is "about to collapse" […]

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Bob Saget’s widow, Kelly Rizzo, pays tribute to ‘my sweet husband’: ‘We loved each other so damn much’

Kelly Rizzo posted an emotional tribute to husband Bob Saget. (Photo: Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic) Kelly Rizzo, the widow of Bob Saget , is paying tribute to the comic and Full House star a day after he was laid to rest in a private funeral . The 65-year-old’s death was announced Sunday after he was found in an Orlando, Fla. hotel room, having apparently died in his sleep .

Though Rizzo, who wed Saget in 2018, has shared messages on her Instagram Stories over the past week — including thanking friends John Mayer and Jeff Ross for retrieving her husband’s car from the LAX airport parking lot — her Instagram post on Saturday marked her first since his death.

"My sweet husband," the Eat Travel Rock host wrote alongside a selfie of herself and Saget. "After much reflection this week, I’m trying, really trying, to not think I was robbed of time. But instead to think: How lucky was I that I got to be the one to be married to THE MOST INCREDIBLE MAN ON EARTH. I was the one who got to go on this crazy ride with him and be in his life these last six years. We had that time to make each other the happiest we’d ever been and change each other’s lives forever. I got to be the one to love him and cherish him. He deserves all the love. Every ounce of it. Because that’s how amazing Bob was. He was love. If you were in his life you KNEW he loved you. He never missed an opportunity to tell you." She continued, "Most importantly. I have no regrets. We loved each other so damn much and told each other 500 times every day. Constantly. I know how much he loved me until the very last moment and he knew the same. I’m so grateful for that. Not everyone gets that.

"Bob was a force," she wrote. "I’m sure every one of you out there, whether you knew him or not, was in awe of the enormous outpouring of love and tribute for this special man. It was like nothing anyone has ever seen. I am so appreciative for the kindness and support from loved ones and strangers. Everyone loves Bob and everyone wants to make sure I’m OK. And for that, I’m eternally grateful.

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Celine Dion Cancels 2022 North American Tour Dates Due to Health Concerns

Celine Dion is bringing her Courage World Tour to an early end in the United States and Canada. The singer shared the unfortunate news with fans on Saturday, saying that she would need to spend the spring recovering from “severe and persistent muscle spasms” inhibiting her ability to perform.

“I was really hoping that I’d be good to go by now, but I suppose I just have to be more patient and follow the regimen that my doctors are prescribing,” Dion said in a statement. “There’s a lot of organizing and preparation that goes into our shows, and so we have to make decisions today which will affect the plans two months down the road. I’ll be so glad to get back to full health, as well as all of us getting past this pandemic, and I can’t wait to be back on stage again.”

More from Variety

The remaining North American stretch of Dion’s Courage World Tour was set for dates between March 9 and April 22. Dion had already performed 52 shows across North America for the tour, beginning before the COVID-19 pandemic shuttered live entertainment in March 2020.

As of now, the Courage World Tour’s European stretch of performances is still on the books for Dion. The first concert is scheduled for May 25 in Birmingham, England.

This isn’t the first shift in scheduling Dion has elected to commit to for the sake of medical recovery. The singer delayed her Las Vegas residency due to muscle spasms, which was interfering with her ability to perform and rehearse. The residency was originally set for dates in Nov. 2021 with additional 2022 dates in January and February.

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Ralph Emery, the ‘Dean of Country Music Broadcasters,’ Dead at 88

GettyImages-82868209-2 – Credit: Tom Burns/GettyImages Ralph Emery, a radio and TV personality whose steady voice and buttoned-up likeness were synonymous with country music , has died. According to a statement from his family, Emery died Saturday at a Nashville hospital. He was 88.

Along with being a DJ at Nashville radio stations like WSIX and the legendary WSM, the home of the Grand Ole Opry, Emery became the face of The Nashville Network (TNN). From 1983 until 1993, he hosted the cable channel’s primetime talk show Nashville Now , interviewing legends of the genre: Waylon Jennings, Chet Atkins, John Prine, Keith Whitley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Crystal Gayle, and Barbara Mandrell all sat across from Emery’s desk.

More from Rolling Stone While country music was the bedrock of the series, rock singers, adult-contemporary crooners, and politicians also made appearances. Neil Young and Waylon Jennings sat for an interview and performance in 1984, Grand Funk Railroad’s Mark Farner sang “I’m Your Captain” in 1989, and Wayne Newton paid tribute to Elvis Presley in a melodramatic 1992 performance . Most notably, a month before the 1992 presidential election, Emery interviewed candidate Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton, along with Al Gore and Tipper Gore, peppering them with questions about jobs and, for Gore, the health of the planet. The Democratic ticket would win the White House a few weeks later. Emery was a Tennessee native, born March 10, 1933, in the town of McEwen, about an hour west of Nashville. He began his radio career in 1951, working for a spell at WTPR in Paris, Tennessee, before relocating to Nashville. He landed at WSM in 1957 and stayed at the home of the Opry until 1972. Along the way, he began to make inroads into television, launching his on-camera career in earnest in 1963 with the local show Opry Almanac . The series Sixteenth Avenue and The Ralph Emery Show followed.

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Mystery of missing ’90s boy band Sudden Impact finally solved: ’30 years later, we’re still trying to figure out what happened’

Sudden Impact i Boyz II Men’s "Motownphilly" video (Photo: YouTube" In 1991, college student and future pop-culture critic/VJ Dave Holmes saw Boyz II Men’s “Motownphilly” video on MTV, and the moment — actually, an extremely specific moment, at the video’s 2:38 mark — ended up haunting him for the next three decades. It was a fleeting glimpse of Boyz II Men’s labelmates Sudden Impact, but as Holmes jokes to Yahoo Entertainment, “It was neither sudden nor an impact. Thirty years later, we’re still trying to figure out what happened.”

Holmes explains, “Sudden Impact were a boy band that was under the wing of Michael Bivins of New Edition and Bell Biv Devoe, who in the early ‘90s had a development deal. He discovered Boyz II Men. He discovered Another Bad Creation. And the third act in his three-artist production deal was a group called Sudden Impact. In the video for ‘Motownphilly,’ Boyz II Men’s debut, each [Bivins protégé] gets a little featured moment at the end; I call it ‘The Michael Bivins Extended Cinematic Universe.’ And there, against a black seamless background, underneath their name, which is in lights, I see it: ‘Sudden Impact.’ There’s these five guys, in five white button-down shirts and five neckties, and they look at the camera and they point right at the camera. It’s like, ‘ Here we are ! Here comes Sudden Impact !’

“And that was the only thing they ever did. And as a young pop consumer, I wanted to know what the deal was. We were at the height of New Kids on the Block’s fame. So, it’s like, ‘Sudden Impact are gonna be huge!’ And then they didn’t happen. It was like seeing a really good trailer for a huge movie, with a bunch of your favorite stars in it — and then the movie just never comes out.” So, why did Sudden Impact’s cameo have, well, such a lasting impact on Holmes, when it was so brief? “I think probably because it was so brief. And because I have a mind that seeks those kinds of things out; I am obsessed with popular culture and music and all of that stuff,” Holmes chuckles. “I was just kind of frustrated. Those [college years] were formative times for me, and through the repetition of that video, I kept seeing them and kept wondering. And the fact that I do have a mind that holds on to such things really prevented me from having a normal life — but did lead me to the life that I have now, which I’m really proud of.”

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Dallas Frazier, Songwriter of ‘Elvira,’ ‘Alley Oop’ and Many Country Hits, Dies at 82

Dallas Frazier , a songwriter who broke out with the pop novelty hit “Alley Oop” and went on pen country classics like the Oak Ridge Boys ’ “Elvira,” died Friday at 82.

“Dallas Frazier is among the greatest country songwriters of all time,” said Kyle Young, CEO of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. “He could convey infectious fun with ‘Elvira,’ and then write something as stunningly sad and true as ‘Beneath Still Waters’” — a No. 1 hit for Emmylou Harris. “He was a man of kindness, generosity and faith, who overcame a hardscrabble upbringing to offer smiling gifts to all of us.”

Among those cutting Frazier’s songs were Charley Pride (who had four No. 1 hits with Frazier numbers), Connie Smith (who recorded an entire album of his songs), George Jones (who did the same), Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Charlie Rich, Rodney Crowell, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Moe Bandy, Diana Ross, Brenda Lee and Poco.

Born Oct. 27, 1939, in Spiro, Oklahoma, Frazier moved to the country music mecca of Bakersfield, Calif. with his family in his pre-teen years. When he was 12, he appeared at a talent show which had country legend Ferlin Husky as a judge — who was so impressed that he went on to mentor Frazier in the music business and to have the youth write songs for him.

“Then, I worked singing on television in Los Angeles from ’54-’58 with Cliffie Stone’s ‘Hometown Jamboree’,” he told the Nashville Songwriters Association International. “So, I’m in the business. As a matter of fact, I signed with Capitol Records when I was 14, and I wrote some of the material that I recorded.” At 14, he cut his first Capitol single, “Space Command.” Little became of it, but he would strike gold later with another novelty hit.

In 1957, Frazier was 19 when he wrote “Alley Oop” in his head while working for his father in a California cotton mill. “Cotton was one of the biggest farm industries in the San Joaquin Valley at one time, back in the ’50s and ’60s. … I’m in this big, huge cotton trailer that’s full of cotton. … I get to thinking about the cartoon character (Alley Oop).I start just kind of riffing with an ‘Oop-oop’… I wrote that song that day before I got through with my shift at the cotton gin.”